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Three easy-to-grow peppers

Posted in  Plants, Trees & Shrubs,Fruits, Veggies & Herbs

Here’s a sampler of tasty peppers to try at home, including some ideal for a container garden.

Blushing Beauty

blushing beauty sweet pepper
'Blushing Beauty'
Photo courtesy
All-America Selections

‘Blushing Beauty’ describes the color changes of this sweet bell pepper. On bushy compact plants, peppers gracefully blush from ivory to pink and red as they mature. The thick-walled peppers are sweet, regardless of color. ‘Blushing Beauty’ peppers can be harvested in about 72to 75 days from transplanting.

An All-America Selection in 2000, this compact plant grows about 18 inches tall and is attractive when grown in patio containers. The multiple disease tolerances lengthen plant life for a higher yield of ivory, pink or red sweet peppers.

Holy Mole

holy mole pepper
'Holy Molé'
Photo courtesy
All-America Selections

‘Holy Molé’ is the first hybrid pasilla-type pepper; it is used to make the famous molé sauce of Mexican cuisine. This tangy, 2007 All-America Selection is resistant to viruses. Mature plants grow about 3 feet tall, which make it a perfect size for patio containers. The immature green peppers are 7 to 9 inches long and can be harvested in about 85 days from transplanting. If peppers are left on the plant, they will mature to a dark chocolate color.

 

Mariachi

mariachi peppers
'Mariachi'
Photo courtesy
All-America Selections

‘Mariachi’ produces an abundant crop of high-quality, mild chili peppers. This variety ripens from creamy white to red; however, when harvested at the lighter color, the flavor is delicate, described by judges as “having fruity undertones reminiscent of melons.” It is a 2007 All-America Selection winner.

‘Mariachi’ peppers are moderately pungent, with Scoville readings in the 500 to 600 range when grown under non-stressful conditions. The scale is named after American chemist Wilbur Scoville, who devised a way to measure a pepper’s “hotness.” A sweet pepper rates zero on the scale, while the hottest habenero tallies 300,000. Add stress, such as extremely hot weather or overly dry soil, and its Scoville readings may climb. Peppers can be harvested in about 66 days from transplanting.